About Costa Rica

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Costa Rica has bewilderingly diverse landscapes, flora, and fauna. From rain forests, to dry tropical and temperate forests, to volcanoes, to Caribbean and Pacific beaches, to high mountains, and marshy lowlands.

Costa Rica is one of the world’s most popular destinations for eco-tourists because of its biodiversity. It has been stated in various places that Costa Rica may contain as much as 6% of the world’s plant and animal species in an area the combined size of the U.S. states of Vermont and New Hampshire. Both tropical plant and animal species abound in Costa Rica. Some of the more impressive plants range from huge ficus trees with epiphytes abounding on their limbs to approximately 1500 different orchids. The animals are equally as impressive, whether it’s a jaguar (the largest cat in the New World), the ever-elusive Margay, or the wonderful birds like the green or scarlet macaws (lapas in Costa Rican Spanish.) The amphibians are also quite impressive; the poison dart frogs with their bright colors are bound to catch your attention, or the giant cane toads.

Costa Rica regions

Caribbean Costa Rica

The least visited region of the country, owing to its relative isolation (and mosquitoes), which has great opportunities for whitewater rafting and sea turtle spotting

Central Valley

The population center of Costa Rica

Central Pacific

Home to the lion’s share of Costa Rica’s beaches

Guanacaste

The “dry region” of Costa Rica, with few rains any time of year, fabulous beaches and surfing, and some large volcanic and dry forest parks in the North by the Nicaraguan border

Plains of the North

A sparsely populated, but beautiful and mountainous region, most famous for its active volcano, Arenal, and the surrounding hot springs and volcanic lakes

South Costa Rica

Enter the Costa Rican rainforest; one of the most biodiverse environments on the planet, full of exotic endemic flora and fauna, and some of the planet’s most beautiful and remote tropical beaches